1982 Ducati MHR

The Mike Hailwood Replica Ducati

| September/October 2009

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    George Spelvin's 1982 Ducati MHR
    Photo by Robert Smith
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    Mike Hailwood racing the Ducati at the Isle of Man TT in 1978.
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    George Spelvin's 1982 Ducati MHR.
    Photo by Robert Smith
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    The tail fairing and seat on George Spelvin's 1982 Ducati MHR ape the setup on Hailwood's race bike.
    Photo by Robert Smith
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    Screened Dell’Orto carbs on bevel engine look mean on George Spelvin's 1982 Ducati MHR.
    Photo by Robert Smith
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    Delicate rearsets on George Spelvin's 1982 Ducati MHR.
    Photo by Robert Smith
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    George Spelvin's 1982 Ducati MHR
    Photo by Robert Smith
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    George Spelvin's 1982 Ducati MHR.
    Photo by Robert Smith
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    George Spelvin's 1982 Ducati MHR.
    Photo by Robert Smith
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    George Spelvin's 1982 Ducati MHR.
    Photo by Robert Smith
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    Even with over 7,000 made, good examples of the Ducati Mike Hailwood Replica command a high price, with the earlier bikes the most valuable.
    Photo by Robert Smith

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Ducati MHR
Years produced:
 1979-1985
Number produced: 7,169
Claimed power: 63hp @ 7,400rpm (1982)
Top speed: 130mph (est.)
Engine type: 864cc desmodromic SOHC air-cooled V-twin
Weight (dry): 463lb (210kg)
Price then: $6,400 (approx.)
Price now: $8,000-$20,000
MPG: 40-50 (est.)

Hollywood could never have written a better script. And who knows — with the success of The World’s Fastest Indian, they might just make the movie of “Mike the Bike” Hailwood and his 1978 Isle of Man TT comeback triumph. If not, at least the Ducati MHR allows you to look a little like Hailwood when you're crusing down the street.

Mike Hailwood, one of the most celebrated racers of all time, was effectively pushed out of top-level motorcycle racing in 1968 when Honda ended its involvement in GP and then enforced a no-compete clause in Hailwood’s contract to make sure he didn’t ride for anyone else.

So “Mike the Bike” became a car guy, racing in 4-wheeled Formula One for Reg Parnell, John Surtees and Bruce McLaren. He quit in 1974 after badly injuring a foot in a crash at the Nürburgring. In 1978, then living in New Zealand and bored with retirement, Hailwood let it be known he might ride again.



But why would any racing team, even the small-time Sports Motor Cycles operation based in Manchester, England, want to hire a superannuated rider with a gammy foot and a noticeable paunch who hadn’t twisted a grip competitively in 11 years? Good question.

Read Alan Cathcart's experience of road testing Mike Hailwood's original Ducati 900TT1 






November December Vintage Motorcycle Events

Blue Moon Cycle Euro Bike Swap Meet and Vintage Ride


Make plans for the 28th Annual Blue Moon Cycle Euro Bike Swap Meet on Saturday, Oct. 27, followed by the Blue Moon Cycle Vintage Ride on Sunday, Oct. 28!

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