Kawasaki KZ750

Under the radar

| March/April 2009

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    Kawasaki KZ750
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    1967 Yamaha XS650
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    1977 BMW R80/7

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Kawasaki KZ750
Years produced:
 1976-1983
Total production: N/A
Claimed power: 55hp @ 7000rpm (1976)
Top speed: 103mph (period test)
Engine type: 745cc OHC, air-cooled parallel twin
Transmission: 5-speed
Weight: 504lbs (w/half-tank fuel)
Price then: $1,975 (1976)
Price now: $500-$1,750
MPG: 45-55

If ever a machine was worthy of Under the Radar status, it’s the big twin Kawasaki KZ750. Never heard of it? Don’t feel bad, because the truth is, most people haven’t.

Introduced in 1976, the KZ750 was the odd-man-out in Kawasaki’s lineup, especially considering the new bikes Kawasaki had planned for 1977, which included the 4-cylinder KZ650 and KZ1000. Matched up against those two machines and the carry-over KZ900 four, the 750 didn’t quite make sense. With its legendary 2-stroke triples a thing of the past, Kawasaki’s performance machines were being defined by four cylinders. So why a big twin?

The vertical twin
Before the onslaught of big triples and fours, the 750cc category was pretty much defined by vertical twins; or more to the point, British vertical twins like the Royal Enfield Interceptor, Norton Commando and Triumph Bonneville. Yamaha made some motion into the category with the Yamaha XS650 vertical twin in 1970, and even more so with the Yamaha TX750 three years later. But compared to its British rivals the XS650 was considered small, while the TX750 was a regrettable failure. By the end of 1975, there were really only two large vertical twins on the market, the 750cc Triumph Bonneville and the 650cc Yamaha XS650.



Looked at from this light, Kawasaki’s move made sense. While the days of Rule Britannia were over, there was still a sizeable community of riders who wanted a big twin. For that group, the new fours were too much. They had two too many cylinders, too many camshafts, too many carburetors and too many spark plugs. For these riders, the best bike wasn’t defined by quarter-mile performance, it was defined by ease of maintenance and dependability. And on that score, the KZ750 delivered.

Unlike Kawasaki’s last big twin, the BSA-clone W650, the KZ750 was thoroughly up-to-date. The 55 horsepower, 745cc twin had double overhead cams, shim and bucket valve adjustment, a Morse Hy-Vo primary drive chain and five forward gears. Vertical twins vibrate, so Kawasaki gave the 750 a pair of chain-driven counter balancers. It worked — mostly. Although smooth at low and moderate rpms, period testers faulted the twin for a distinct buzzing at anything over 4,000rpm, and feared it would shake itself apart at anything approaching its 7,750rpm redline: It wouldn’t, it just felt that way.

RegroTweler
8/4/2018 7:10:14 PM

got mine out of a barn after 26yrs storage. less than 5,000 miles on it! took months of cleaning and adjusting but it's roadable now! like to see the seat rebuild that Talkradiobuilder did, seated center of gravity on this is a bit tall!! LOVE this bike!


RegroTweler
8/4/2018 7:04:00 PM

KZ750!! Love it! Got mine out of a shed after 26yrs storage(less than 5000mi). couple months of carefull cleaning & some replacement & it's AWESOME! Really nice exhaust tones & the low-end torque is great! would like to lower the seat Talkradiobuilder!!


RegroTweler
8/4/2018 7:03:59 PM

got mine out of a barn after 26yrs storage. less than 5,000 miles on it! took months of cleaning and adjusting but it's roadable now! like to see the seat rebuild that Talkradiobuilder did, seated center of gravity on this is a bit tall!! LOVE this bike!







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